Learn effective tips.
Practice daily.
Write creatively.
Edit your work.

Definition Of Faith


Defining faith can be a difficult process. Governments must respect the concept of faith and those who have faith and yet they lack a thorough and comprehensive definition for what faith actually is. For many people faith means a belief in a deity or higher power. For others faith simply means believing in something--not necessarily a god--without having definitive proof.

Part of the reason for struggle between religions and in particular between those who are of faith and those who are not is the lack of definition of faith. Some religious people may define faith as a belief in a monotheistic god which means that others who believe in multiple gods do not have faith in the eyes of the monotheistic believers. This can apply in the opposite direction too. For many atheists they would define faith in much the same way only instead of a belief in a monotheistic god or in multiple gods they would define their faith in something else such as compassion or the inherent good in humanity. Because of underlying differences within the various definitions of faith there are many struggles between groups with different definitions to assimilate with one another. Groups like this struggle to assimilate with those who belief something different compared to their beliefs.

A definition of faith is not something typically discussed but it is something that can be visible in terms of communication. People with deeply held beliefs often hold deep definitions of faith which come forward when they speak. People will talk about having faith regularly and yet if someone who is--for example--atheist remarks that they too have faith those who know that a difference in definition exists may mock or doubt the faith of the other. They may even go so far as to remark that the other person’s version of faith is vastly different from theirs and therefore not compatible.

While it is not the job of the government nor an appropriate role for them to fill to define faith many people can turn to their religious leaders to offer a comprehensive definition. These leaders may provide a definition that differs from religious leaders nearby. This causes the problem of varying definitions to arise yet again. Without a fully accepted government definition of faith there will remain ill treatment of others based on differences of opinion and different definitions for the idea of “faith”.

Defining faith can be a difficult process. Governments must respect the concept of faith and those who have faith and yet they lack a thorough and comprehensive definition for what faith actually is. For many people faith means a belief in a deity or higher power. For others faith simply means believing in something--not necessarily a god--without having definitive proof.

Part of the reason for struggle between religions and in particular between those who are of faith and those who are not is the lack of definition of faith. Some religious people may define faith as a belief in a monotheistic god which means that others who believe in multiple gods do not have faith in the eyes of the monotheistic believers. This can apply in the opposite direction too. For many atheists they would define faith in much the same way only instead of a belief in a monotheistic god or in multiple gods they would define their faith in something else such as compassion or the inherent good in humanity. Because of underlying differences within the various definitions of faith there are many struggles between groups with different definitions to assimilate with one another. Groups like this struggle to assimilate with those who belief something different compared to their beliefs.

A definition of faith is not something typically discussed but it is something that can be visible in terms of communication. People with deeply held beliefs often hold deep definitions of faith which come forward when they speak. People will talk about having faith regularly and yet if someone who is--for example--atheist remarks that they too have faith those who know that a difference in definition exists may mock or doubt the faith of the other. They may even go so far as to remark that the other person’s version of faith is vastly different from theirs and therefore not compatible.

While it is not the job of the government nor an appropriate role for them to fill to define faith many people can turn to their religious leaders to offer a comprehensive definition. These leaders may provide a definition that differs from religious leaders nearby. This causes the problem of varying definitions to arise yet again. Without a fully accepted government definition of faith there will remain ill treatment of others based on differences of opinion and different definitions for the idea of “faith”.